Academics

Course Catalog

Lincoln High School Course Catalog

Introduction

Hello, Lincoln Lynx!

In this document you will find descriptions of the courses projected to be offered at Lincoln. This is not a static document; it will grow and change over the years as our students? areas of interest and needs evolve. Courses not yet offered will have the year listed when they will be projected to be offered based on student need. We will add and or delete courses as we grow to meet the needs of the incoming students.

Courses offered are aimed at challenging students academically; we encourage all students to pick an area to push themselves by opting into advanced courses that will help prepare them for the rigors of career and college. In some areas, you will see the addition of college-level, ?college in the high school,? courses as one of the options to meet the new requirements to graduate. Our counselors will meet with students annually to track progress towards graduation.

As you review the course offerings, read the course descriptions carefully, making note of the important information such as course prerequisites and homework requirements. Be mindful of the out-of-class homework requirements when considering the number of advanced classes you sign up for. Also keep in mind high school graduation requirements and your post-secondary aspirations.

We look forward to supporting you.
Lincoln High School Staff


2021-2022 Course Catalog

The following 2021-2022 Course Catalog links contain same information that is in the printable PDF version of the full Course Catalog.  The information here and in the printable PDF version are being updated periodically as new course information becomes available but is still subject to change.

Use the + symbols to display the 2021-2022 Course Catalog course descriptions.  

English Language Arts Modified A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Consultation with Case Manager
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed

English Language Arts Modified focuses on specially designed instruction aligned to students’ IEP goals and objectives with modified grading, content and materials from the general education curriculum. The purposes of the course are to improve literal and inferential comprehension skills, vocabulary, reading rate, reading related study skills, and interest in reading. Curriculum is based on students’ IEP goals and objectives as well as modified general education curriculum and content.

Intro to Literature & Composition A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: 1-2 hours per week / as needed

This course concentrates on critical reading of texts from different genres, reflecting themes of identity and self-discovery, and on clear and purposeful writing aligned to the Design Thinking process. Course topics and texts are aligned to the “Origins, Identity, and Agency” domain of the SPS Ethnic Studies Framework.

World Lit & Composition A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: 1-2 hours per week / as needed

This class concentrates on how the human experience is expressed in literature from around the world. Students learn to read analytically and write clearly and purposefully. Course topics and texts are aligned to the “Power and Oppression” domain of the SPS Ethnic Studies Framework.

American Literature & Composition A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 11
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: 1-2 hours per week / as needed

American Literature & Composition continues to emphasize writing, discussion, and literary analysis. The literary emphasis is on the work of American authors, with texts selected based on input from students. Course outcomes include developing research skills, communication skills, and various modes of writing. Course topics and texts are aligned to the “Resistance and Liberation” domain of the SPS Ethnic Studies Framework.

AP English Language & Composition 1/2

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 11
  • Prerequisite: Recommended B or better in World Lit and Composition
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: 5-7 hours per week

This course is designed to bring students to independence in their learning through student centered discussion and study. Course work focuses on diction, presentation and construction of ideas, and writing about concepts, all elements of AP preparatory work emphasizing Language and Composition. The strategies for “timed writings” are established during this course. This course is strongly recommended to any student considering taking AP English Literature and Composition. AP designation will be added to the student’s final transcript. Students are expected to take the AP exam, but that exam is not part of the course grade.

ENGL 101A/B English Composition (CIHS)

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Earn North Seattle Community College credits (5) for $TBD–classes will be taught at Lincoln by Lincoln staff
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: 2-3 hours per week

Survey of 20th century fiction. Study and analysis of the art, elements, and techniques of short stories, novellas, and novels of American and international authors. Through this North Seattle College course, eligible students have the option to register to earn NSC credits through the College in the High School program.

AP English Literature & Composition 1/2

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 12
  • Prerequisite: Recommended B or better in 11th grade Language Arts class
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: 5-7 hours per week
This course takes up where AP Language and Composition concludes, focusing on the elements of memorable and effective literature. Students will learn to read a variety of literary styles independently and critically for structure, style, and themes, with an emphasis on independent thinking and discussion. The strategies for “timed writings” and other AP preparatory work will be carried over from AP Language and Composition. The AP designation will be recorded on the students’ final transcript. Students are expected to take the AP exam, but that exam is not part of the course grade.

World History 1 “Ethnic Studies”

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9 (Required), 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As needed

Students will focus on civilizations and empires from the Post-Classical Era (600 to 1440 CE) and make connections to the modern world. This class is structured around developing historical thinking skills as a basis for becoming a well-informed global citizen with highly developed critical thinking skills. The class will base its topics and learning objectives on the SPS Ethnic Studies Framework.

World History 1 Immersion Honors in Spanish

Same as general World History 1 course but this course will be taught in Spanish.

World History 2 “Ethnic Studies”

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, (required grade 10), 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Weekly Averages, 60-120 minutes

Students will engage in the study of the global expansion and interactions between approximately 1440 CE to 1900. The focus of the content will be on developing a global worldview that emphasizes the interconnectedness of humans and understanding how the modern world has developed. The class is structured around continuing to develop strong historical and scientific research skills as a basis for becoming a well-informed global citizen with highly-developed critical thinking skills.  The class will base its topics and learning objectives on the SPS Ethnic Studies Framework.

World History Immersion 2 Honors in Spanish

Same as general World History 2 course but this course will be taught in Spanish. 

World History 3 “Ethnic Studies”

  • .5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, (required grade 10), 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Weekly Averages, 60-120 minutes

Students will investigate the modern world, between approximately 1900-present, and how global trends have developed. The focus of the content will be on more fully developing a worldview that emphasizes global citizenship and ethical decision-making. The class is structured around extending and deepening strong historical and scientific research skills as a basis for becoming a well-informed global citizen with highly developed critical thinking skills. The class will base its topics and learning objectives on the SPS Ethnic Studies Framework.

World History 3 Immersion Honors in Spanish

Same as general World History 3 course but this course will be taught in Spanish.

AP Human Geography

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10 
  • Prerequisite: Recommended “B” avg in Humanities classes
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 60 minutes

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth & and its surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. Students are expected to take the AP exam, but that exam is not part of the course grade.

US History “Ethnic Studies

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 11
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Weekly Averages, 60-120 minutes

This course covers major topics in the history of the United States predominantly from 1900 to the present day. It focuses on the development of the United States both domestically and internationally. Students will explore the political, economic, cultural and social heritage of the U.S. Students will gain an appreciation for the diversity of the American experience and how it has shaped the nation’s democratic way of life. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to compare and contrast previous trends and issues in the nation’s history with current issues facing the U.S. today.  The class will base its topics and learning objectives on the SPS Ethnic Studies Framework.

US History CIHS 147

  • .5 Credit / paired with 148 1 Year – Grade 11
  • Earn Edmonds Community College credits (5) for $TBD–classes will be taught at Lincoln by Lincoln staff
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 60 Minutes

This course will have students be aware of seminal events, movements, and institutions in American history from Precolonial indigenous societies and then to the election of Andrew Jackson until the start of World War I, along with key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development. Students will compare/contrast the philosophies, issues, and actions of different geographic regions, time periods, religions, races, and/or social status during this time period. In studying this time period, students will look at the issues from multiple perspectives of people from different religions, ethnicities, races, and genders. The course will ask students to develop their abilities to examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.
Students will have the opportunity to opt into College in the High School (CIHS) for US History through Edmonds Community College. Students who enroll for credit through the CIHS will need to meet the course standards and expectations required by Edmonds Community College. Teachers will share information about this option at the beginning of the class including course requirements. Once enrolled in the class students will need to submit the appropriate paperwork and pay the class fees. For more information, click the link below for the College in High School Programs see the following links: https://www.edcc.edu/highschool/chs/

US History CIHS 148

  • .5 Credit / paired with 147 1 Year – Grade 11
  • Earn Edmonds Community College credits (5) for $TBD–classes will be taught at Lincoln by Lincoln staff
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 60 Minutes

This course will have students be aware of seminal events, movements, and institutions in American history from World War I until the end of the Cold War, along with key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development. Students will compare/contrast the philosophies, issues, and actions of different geographic regions, time periods, religions, races, and/or social status during this time period. In studying this time period, students will look at the issues from multiple perspectives of people from different religions, ethnicities, races, and genders. The course will ask students to develop their abilities to examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.
Students will have the opportunity to opt into College in the High School (CIHS) for US History through Edmonds Community College. Students who enroll for credit through the CIHS will need to meet the course standards and expectations required by Edmonds Community College. Teachers will share information about this option at the beginning of the class including course requirements. Once enrolled in the class students will need to submit the appropriate paperwork and pay the class fees. For more information, click the link below for the College in High School Programs see the following links: https://www.edcc.edu/highschool/chs/

AP US History

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 11
  • HSS
  • CADR
  • Prerequisite: Recommended “B” average in Humanities classes
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 60 Minutes

The scope of this class is extensive and covers discovery and exploration through current American policies and events. The depth of information will be the focus, as opposed to breadth of information, as in years’ past. Instruction strategies will include skill development in: note-taking, test preparation, essay writing, research skills, and analysis of different interpretations of historical, political and social events and themes. Independent reading, study and following current events is expected. Students are expected to take the AP exam, but that exam is not part of the course grade.

American Government & Econ

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As needed

This course introduces students to issues in American government and politics, including the historical and philosophical basis for democracy. Topics include civil rights and civil liberties, political parties, the role of media in national life and the debate over federal versus state power. Students will be asked to demonstrate their historical thinking skills through reading/writing, research, discussion, debate, mock trial, and simulation in this class. Students are expected to complete a classroom-based assessment in civics equal to the ones laid out by OSPI.

AP U.S. Government & Politics

  • 1 Credit /.5 per semester – Grade 12
  • Prerequisite: Recommended “B” average in Humanities classes
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 60 Minutes
  • 5 credit per semester Prerequisite: AP Government is intended to match the intensity of an introductory college Government class. All of the readings are at the college level and the class moves very quickly. Average homework: AP Government will require about 50 pages of reading per week and 20-30 minutes of homework per night on average. AP students are expected to take the AP test in the spring.
    United States Government and Politics gives students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes the study of general concepts used to interpret U S. government and politics along with the analysis of specific examples. Students successfully completing this course will: know important facts, concepts, and theories pertaining to U.S. government and politics; understand typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences; be able to analyze and interpret basic data relevant to U.S. government and politics; be able to critically analyze relevant theories and concepts, apply them appropriately. This course requires considerable reading and homework outside of class to be successful.

 

MATH PATHWAYS IMAGE

Algebra 1 A/B

  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Scientific Calculator, graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook
  • Homework: Daily, 30 minutes

Algebra 1 focuses on five areas: (1) writing, interpreting, and translating between forms of linear equations and inequalities, and exponential functions, and using them to solve problems; (2) compare and contrast linear and exponential functions, use function notation, and interpret arithmetic and geometric sequences (3) use regression techniques to describe linear relationships quantitatively and make judgments about the appropriateness of linear models; (4) work with rational exponents, create quadratic and exponential expressions, and solve equations, inequalities and systems of equations involving quadratic expressions; and (5) compare quadratic, linear, and exponential functions in modeling and identify the zeros of a quadratic. Other functions covered are: absolute value, step, and those that are piecewise-defined.

Algebra 1 A/B Modified

  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Consultation with IEP case manager
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Scientific Calculator, graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook
  • Homework: Daily, 30 minutes

Algebra 1 M focuses on specially designed instruction aligned to student IEP goals and objective with modified grading, content and materials from the general education curriculum. See Algebra 1 course description for more information.

Geometry A/B

  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Algebra 1
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Scientific Calculator, Compass, Protractor, Ruler, pencils, graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook
  • Homework: Daily, 30 minutes

In Geometry, students explore complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout the course allow students to experience math as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problems.

Geometry A/B Modified

  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Algebra 1 or Algebra 1 M & consultation with IEP case manager
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Scientific Calculator, Compass, Protractor, Ruler, pencils, graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

Geometry M focuses on specially designed instruction aligned to students’ IEP goals and objectives with modified grading, content and materials from the general education curriculum. See Geometry course description for more information.

Algebra 2 A/B

  • .5 credit/1 semester or 1.0/Yearlong – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Algebra 1 and Geometry
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+ (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

Algebra 2A is a semester-long course that extends student understanding of functions and data analysis. Students will encounter a variety of algebraic mathematical issues, including arithmetic and geometric sequences; standard deviation and measures of center; expressions with rational and negative exponents; manipulation and transformations of linear, quadratic, exponential, rational, and more general algebraic expressions, equations and inequalities; and systems of equations and inequalities.Algebra 2B is a semester-long course that continues to extend student understanding of the number system to complex numbers (including as solutions to quadratic equations). Students will encounter a variety of algebraic mathematical issues, including the use of matrices to organize information and solve systems; expressions with rational and negative exponents; modeling with sequences and series, polynomial, inverse variation, and rational functions; and probability and statistical applications.

Algebra 2 A/B Modified

  • 1.0 credit /Yearlong – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Algebra 1/ Algebra 1 M and Geometry/Geometry M and consultation with IEP case manager
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+, (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

Algebra 2A and 2B focuses on on specially designed instruction aligned to students’ IEP goals and objectives with modified grading, content and materials from the general education curriculum. See Algebra 2 course description for more information.

Algebra 2 A/B Honors

  • 1.0 /Yearlong – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2A
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+, (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook
  • Homework: Daily, 45-60 minutes

The distinction between Algebra 2 and Algebra 2 Honors is the pace at which the course moves, and additional subject matter that will be covered. This course is recommended for students pursuing advanced mathematics.

Math 107: Math in Society

  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 11,12
  • Prerequisite: Algebra 2
  • Earn Edmonds Community College credits (5) for $TBD–classes will be taught at Lincoln by Lincoln staff
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+ (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook.
  • Homework: Daily 30-60 minutes

One-year Math in Society college course. This course introduces math topics used in a variety of liberal arts disciplines, such as mathematical modeling, representational statistics, probability, and finance math. Eligible students can earn college credit.

Pre-Calculus A/B

  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Algebra 1 Geometry, and Algebra
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+, (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook
  • Homework: Daily, 30-60 minutes

This course is a rigorous study of linear, quadratic, exponential, polynomial, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, focusing on structure, dynamics, and graphing. Other topics studied are polar Coordinates and graphing, conics, linear algebra, and discrete mathematics. Students apply traditional mathematical topics in applied settings. In so doing, they exercise mathematical reasoning and see the connections between topics and other disciplines. While solving real-world problems through the use of appropriate technology, students become empowered to communicate mathematics through group activities, experiments and independent projects.

CIHS Pre-Calculus  

  • 1 credit /yearlong – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Algebra 2
  • Earn Edmonds Community College credits (5) for $TBD–classes will be taught at Lincoln by Lincoln staff
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+ (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook.
  • Homework: Daily, 60 minutes

This course is equivalent to the college Precalculus I & II courses. In first semester, students’ model and analyze real-world and mathematical situations using piecewise, absolute value, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, rational, and trigonometric functions. Students extend their understanding of these functions through study of their inverses, reciprocals, and composition of functions. In second semester, students apply trigonometric and triangle relationships to prove trig identities. Students use matrices as a tool to solve systems and vectors to model Physics applications. Students represent conic sections algebraically and graphically. Students extend their understanding of probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions. Eligible students can earn college credits.

AP Calculus AB A/B

  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Grade of B- or higher in both semesters of Precalculus Honors preferred
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+, (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook
  • Homework: Daily, 60+ minutes

AP Calculus AB is roughly equivalent to a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. The AP course covers topics in these areas, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions. This course prepares students for the successful completion of the AP Calculus AB exam. Out of class exam preparation is expected.

AP Calculus BC

  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Grade of A- or better in Pre-Calculus Honors or a B- or better in AP Calculus AB
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+ (or equivalent)
  • Homework: Daily, 60+ minutes

AP Calculus BC with Advanced Math Topics continues the study of integral calculus from a more symbolic approach. Topics include advanced integration techniques, application of integrals, differential equations, derivatives and integrals involving conic, parametric, and polar equations, the convergence of infinite series including Taylor series, vector-valued functions, and some multi-variable calculus. Out of class exam preparation is expected. Students are expected to take the AP exam, but that exam is not part of the course grade. 

AP Statistics

  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Meets Mathematics graduation requirement
  • CADR
  • Prerequisite: Grade of B- or higher in both semesters of Precalculus preferred
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+
  • Homework: Daily, 60+ minutes

This course is an introduction to the major concepts and tools for collection, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: (1) exploring data, describing patterns and departures from patterns; (2) sampling and experimentation, planning and conducting a survey; (3) anticipating patterns, exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation; and (4) statistical inference, estimating population parameters and testing hypothesis. Some major assignments include designing and implementing sample surveys, observational studies, and experiments, critical statistical analysis of real-life data. By the end of this course student will have a working knowledge of the ideas and tools of practical statistics and be able to make informed decisions based on data. Students are expected to take the AP exam, but that exam is not part of the course grade.

Science Pathways image

Physics A

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

In this course, Physics A: Mechanistic Models for Electricity, Magnetism, and Waves, students will study static electricity and current electricity, conservation of energy, energy transfer, magnetism, wavelength and frequency, and light and sound waves. Students will refine their science and engineering skills within the context of an engaging storyline to explain a phenomenon.

Chemistry A

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

In this course, Chemistry A: Origin of the Elements and Material Science, students will study fission, fusion, and radioactive decay, properties of elements, simple chemical reactions, structure of substances and forces between particles, designing materials, life span of the sun, and the way stars produce elements. Students will refine their science and engineering skills within the context of an engaging storyline to explain a phenomenon.

Biology A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Chemistry A, Physics A
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

In Biology A: Tracing Matter and Energy, students will study the formation of carbon-based molecules, organization of multicellular organisms, homeostasis, mitosis, cellular respiration, aerobic and anaerobic conditions, ecosystems, photosynthesis, impacts of human activity, and energy and mineral resources. Students will refine their science and engineering skills within the context of an engaging storyline to explain a phenomenon.
In Biology B: Tracing Information through Generations, students will study mitosis, transcription and translation, homeostasis, inheritance, genetic variation, population genetics, group behavior and survival, evolution, natural selection, adaptation, Earth’s formation, Earth’s systems and life on Earth, carrying capacity, biodiversity, impacts of human activity. Students will refine their science and engineering skills within the context of an engaging storyline to explain a phenomenon.

Physics B

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Chemistry A, Physics A, Biology
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

In this course, Physics B: Mechanics in the Earth Solar System, students will study energy changes and flow, energy associated with motion and relative position, conversion between forms of energy, formation of continental and ocean-floor features, cycling of matter, Newton’s Second Law of motion, conservation of momentum, collisions, and motion of orbiting objects. Students will refine their science and engineering skills within the context of an engaging storyline to explain a phenomenon.

Chemistry B

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Chemistry A, Physics A, Biology
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

In this course, Chemistry B: Reactions, Energy, and Environmental Chemistry, students will study energy flow in a chemical reaction, factors affecting reaction rate, conditions affecting production of a reaction, mass conservation, second law of thermodynamics, changes to earth’s systems, effect of energy flow on climate, properties of water, carbon cycling, climate change, and impacts of human activity. Students will refine their science and engineering skills within the context of an engaging storyline to explain a phenomenon.

AP Physics A&B

  • 1.0 Credit/Yearlong – Grade 10-12
  • Prerequisite: Physics A / Physics B. Completion of Algebra 2 is highly recommended
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $40
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 30-60 minutes –For each hour of class, there may be up to an hour of homework. In the event of special projects, there may be more.

Completion of Algebra II HIGHLY recommended. Designed by the College Board to parallel first-semester college-level courses in algebra-based physics, AP Physics 1 courses focus on Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory circuits. These courses may also include college-level laboratory investigations.

AP Environmental Science 1/2

  • 1 Credit /Yearlong – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisites PhysB/ChemB, BioA/B
  • Suggested Lab Fee : $40
  • Homework : Daily, 30-60 minutes –For each hour of class, there may be up to an hour of homework. In the event of special projects, there may be more.

Prerequisite: completion of a full year of Chemistry (A and B). This course involves the study of a wide variety of sciences, including geology, biology, environmental studies, chemistry, meteorology and geography as well as the study of natural systems, risks associated with these problems, and alternative solutions. Themes include: science as a process, energy in ecosystems, Earth Systems, human impacts, societal context, designing solutions. Can be taken concurrently with ChemB/PhysB w/ teacher permission

AP Biology

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Completion of Biology and two semesters of Chemistry, with B- or better preferred.
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $40
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 30-60 minutes—For each hour of class, there may be up to an hour of homework. In some cases, as with special projects, there may be more.

Prerequisite: completion of a full year of Chemistry (A and B).  AP Biology is an intensive course designed to be the equivalent of an introductory biology course taken in college. The emphasis is on developing an understanding of biological concepts rather than an accumulation of facts. The student should understand and appreciate the science of biology as a process and a personal experience in scientific inquiry that develops their problem solving and critical thinking skills. This course also prepares the high school student to take the AP exam given in May. In order to pass the exam (usually this is with a score of 3 or higher), students must be highly motivated and driven to excel in this challenging course. The format for this class will be primarily flipped, with students doing initial learning at home through reading and videos and class time spent with activities, labs, and in-depth experiences.

AP Chemistry 1/2

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Students should have successfully completed a general high school Chemistry course or equivalent class with B- or better preferred
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $40
  • Materials Required: Edvantage AP Chemistry Workbooks (1 & 2). May be purchased through teacher. Approximately $50 for both books.
  • Homework: Daily, 30-60 minutes—For each hour of class, there may be up to an hour of homework. In some cases, as with special projects, there may be more.

Prerequisite: completion of a full year of Chemistry (A and B).  AP Chemistry is a fast-paced, college-level Chemistry course for students interested in acquiring a greater background in chemistry. The course reviews basic concepts and processes and provides greater depth and more extensive laboratory experience in specific topic areas. In addition, students are introduced to organic and biochemistry and use of sophisticated instruments. Students are expected to take the AP exam, but that exam is not part of the course grade.

Genome Science 1/2

  • 1 Credit /Yearlong – Grade 10 – 12
  • Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra I, Biology, Physics B, Chemistry B
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $40
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 30 minutes

Genome Science is an advanced lab science course devoted to the structure, function, evolution, mapping, and editing of genomes. This course is intended for students who have already completed yearlong courses in high school biology and chemistry. In this course, students will study how genome structure and evolution affect the way species and individuals look, behave, and function, and how bioinformatics, comparative genomics and bioengineering can be used to ask questions and solve problems in scientific research, health, forensics and sustainability. Throughout the course, students discuss and study past and present ethical and societal impacts of genetics and bioengineering, including ownership and privacy of human sequencing data, the manipulation of human genomes, and gene-drives to alter the genetic make-up of populations. Units are based on developing answers to driving questions, and include instruction on bioinformatic tools, phylogenetics, molecular evolutionary analyses, comparative genomics, genetic variation, personalized medicine, molecular forensics, engineering the immune system to fight cancer, understanding and manipulating host-pathogen interactions, harnessing microorganisms to meet societal and environmental needs, and computational modeling of biological systems. Wet lab techniques include polymerase chain reaction, electrophoresis, genetic engineering (including CRISPR), and immunoassays. Students complete one comprehensive, embedded research project per semester and are provided with opportunities to interact with local scientists.

Marine Science 1/2

  • 0.5 credit per semester (may be taken separately or together. Marine Science 1 is NOT a prerequisite for Marine Science 2) – Grade 10-12
  • Prerequisite: Phys A/Chem A. Bio A/Bio B. May be taken concurrently with Chem B/Phys B with teacher permission.
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $40
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

Marine Science is the study of the oceans on planet Earth and is aligned to both NGSS standards and the 7 Ocean Literacy Principles (NMEA). The course of study will begin with a brief look at the history of the formation of the earth itself and its geological structures. Marine Science 1 (semester 1) covers the physical understanding of our oceans through a geological and chemical lens. By the end of the first units, students will be able to explain why we can find marine fossils at 7000 feet of altitude and why the seafloor is so much younger than the earth. Students will learn about the structure and properties of seawater and use systems and scale to be able to describe how and why the oceans are the drivers of our climate and ecosystems.
Marine Science 2 utilizes principles of evolution and concepts from the previous semester to build an understanding of life in our oceans. The units start by exploring the smallest of organisms and the processes that drive life on our planet. Following evolutionary trends, students will first study unicellular life in its many forms, then invertebrates and vertebrates, with a lens on adaptation and survival. Finally, students will explore how these populations drive marine ecosystems. The semester ends with a student driven research project and authentic opportunities in the field.
Resources: (optional)Oceanography: An Invitation to Marine Science 9th Edition, by Tom S. Garrison (or other supporting text)

Introduction to Business

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $20
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed

This course focuses on the general study of business, including the processes of interchanging goods and services (buying, selling and producing), business organization, and accounting as used in profit-making and nonprofit public and private institutions and agencies. Topics of study may include world trade, stock market, housing, banks, finance, ethics, management and global business. 

Social Media Marketing and Advertising

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $20
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed

In this hands-on project-based course students learn the most up-to-date methods of social media marketing and advertising. The skills and expertise they gain will prepare them for prized internships, jobs, and future education. They will work creatively and collaboratively to solve real world marketing problems, with measurable goals and outcomes. This course will immerse students in the social media marketplace. Students will learn how to work with the metrics and demographics that are unique to each social media platform. They will use metrics to track progress and improve outcomes. They will apply the tools and techniques of marketing and advertising to connect with targeted consumers and achieve the goals of their campaigns. Students will work collaboratively in teams to design and create ads, videos, websites, blogs, and other kinds of posts.

Advanced Leadership (Project Management)

  • .5 CTE credit / 1 semester (1 Year for .5 elective credit) – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Intro to Leadership
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Participation in Activities as Assigned
This class is an introduction to Project Management in Contemporary Organizations. It includes the role of the project manager characteristics and attributes of successful project managers; and the challenges of managing projects in a multicultural, global environment. The class covers Project Selection Criteria, the project planning systems, work breakdown structure analysis, negotiation, and conflict resolution to facilitate planning. The course will cover the process and guidelines for developing a schedule, the construction of Gantt Charts, CPM and PERT methods. In addition, students will build on skills developed in Introduction to Leadership (Additional Course Choices tab)

Human Centered Design (Engineering & Design Development 1)

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9 Required; 10, 11, 12 (as needed)
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $20
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed

This course prepares students to apply art and design principles through a variety of project-based learning experiences. Includes instruction in photography, drawing/painting, printmaking, design thinking, shop tools, computer-aided drafting and manufacturing, and 21st century skills. Students will have the opportunity to work with the tools and technology provided in Lincoln’s Maker Space.

Human Centered Design (Engineering & Design Development 2)

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Human Centered Design Into to Engineering & Design Development 1
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $20
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed

Prerequisite Engineering & Design 1. This course expands the STEM concepts and knowledge base learned in Design & Engineering 1. The class covers more in-depth and demanding curriculum pathway that can lead students to engineering, computer programming, industrial technology or other related courses and careers. This course is tied to national math and science standards.

Rapid Prototyping (CAD/CAM) Principles of Engineering

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Human Centered Design Intro to Engineering & Design Development 1
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $30
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed

This is a broad-based survey course designed to help students understand the field of engineering and engineering technology and its career possibilities. Students will develop engineering problem solving skills that are involved in post-secondary education programs and engineering careers. They will explore various engineering systems and manufacturing processes. They will also learn how engineers address concerns about the social and political consequences of technological change.

Electronics/Internet of Things (Digital Electronics)

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Human Centered Design Intro to Engineering & Design Development 1
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $30
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed

Students will be introduced to digital circuits found in video games, watches, calculators, digital cameras, and thousands of other devices. Students will study the application of digital logic and how digital devices are used to control automated equipment. The use of digital circuitry is present in virtually all aspects of our lives and its use is increasing rapidly. this course is similar to a first semester college course and is an important course of study for a student exploring a career in engineering or engineering technology.

Graphic Design Beginning

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed

Graphic Design Beginning is an introductory course that teaches the fundamentals of creatively and effectively communicating through digital images. Employing both traditional and digital tools, students learn graphic design skills, software, and industry standards.

Graphic Design Advanced

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed

Graphic Design Advanced emphasizes the development of an individual style and creative approach to design. Students are challenged to grow as an independent learner with more complex and open-ended design assignments. Students explore real-world, client-based projects such as Yearbook or promotional materials for the district, school, or class.  This course may be repeated for credit.

Photography Beginning

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $40 (materials and supplies)
  • Materials Required: Access to a personal camera preferred (DSLR cameras are ideal); some classroom cameras available.
  • Homework: Frequent photo shoots completed outside of class

Photography Beginning is designed to explore photography as a method of creative visual communication. Students in this course learn basic camera operations and principles of photography such as photo composition, lighting, exposure, and editing.  Can fulfill either the CTE or Fine Arts graduation requirement.

Photography Advanced

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: Photography Foundations
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $40 (materials and supplies)
  • Materials Required: Access to a personal camera preferred (DSLR cameras are ideal); some classroom cameras available.
  • Homework: Frequent photo shoots completed outside of class

Photography Advanced is designed for students interested in expressing their personal creative vision through photography. Students in this course develop their own ideas through open-ended assignments and explore photography as a potential career pathway. This course can be cross-credited for Fine Arts.  Can fulfill either the CTE or Fine Arts graduation requirement.

Video Beginning A & B

  • .5 Credit / 1 Semester or 1 Credit/Year long – 9-12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $20
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: 1 Hour Daily; out of school commitment occasionally required

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of creatively and effectively communicating visual stories through the lens of a video camera, including critical media analysis. Students collaborate while learning the video production process: pre-production (planning, developing ideas, and identifying resources), production (lighting, composition, and audio recording techniques), and post-production (editing with graphics, sound, and visual effects). Types of productions may include narrative, documentary, news, informational, and experimental.  Can fulfill either the CTE or Fine Arts graduation requirement.

Video Advanced A & B

  • .5 Credit /1 Semester or 1 Credit/Yearlong – 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: Video Production 1
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $20
  • Materials required: None
  • Homework: 1 Hour Daily; out of school commitment occasionally required

This is a hands-on, project-based course in which students work in teams to produce a variety of increasingly complex productions. Students refine their understanding of the production process, incorporating more advanced techniques in development, shooting, sound, lighting, editing, graphics and special effects. This course may be cross-credited for Fine Arts.  Can fulfill either the CTE or Fine Arts graduation requirement.

Yearbook / Annual

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $35
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed, dependent upon our production cycle

Be part of our creative team. Yearbook offers the opportunity to be involved in all school activities. Our work includes in-depth practice and application of journalistic methods: interviewing, writing, photography and graphic design. Be prepared, a large portion of our yearbook coverage is from events taking place outside of the school day. You will be required to complete weekly photo assignments and to regularly attend extracurricular activities, club meetings/events, and sports practices/games. As a public representative of our school, you are expected to be professional and considerate when preforming your duties. Digital SLR cameras are available for checkout only on a daily basis. Your work will pay off – colleges recognize the huge commitment that students make when they see this class on transcripts. 

Robotics 1

  • .5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $30
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed

This course will provide students with hands-on practical knowledge of electronic devices that are controlled by microprocessors, and the skills to make such devices work. Students learn to design and build devices that detect their surroundings, move, make noise, play music, communicate, and respond to remote control. In the process these students become programmers with the C language. Among the skills learned are programming microcomputers, parts identification, reading electronic schematics, circuit breadboarding, circuit board fabrication, drilling, parts insertion, and soldering.

Robotics 2

  • .5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: Human Centered Design, Intro to Engineering & Design Developmen 1 and Robotics 1
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $30
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed

This is a continuation of Robotics 1 working on projects. Among the projects are a musical instrument that changes pitch and volume as the hands are moved toward and away from a sensor, a rolling robot that detects and avoids obstacles, a rolling robot that is controlled by an infrared remote. A laser-tag system and various other student chosen projects.

Intro to Computers and the Internet (Exploring Computer Science)

  • .5 Credit /1 Semester – Grade 9,10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily As needed

This course will introduce computer and information technology skills using mobile devices to develop mobile applications. Algorithm development, problem solving, and programming are emphasized. Students will be introduced to topics such as interface design, game design software engineering. This course is designed for students curious about computing careers and is a broad introduction to computer science. There are five content areas in Exploring Computer Science with mobile devices. They are: Human Interface Interaction; Problem Solving; Phone Applications; Introduction to Programming; and Basics of Game Programming.

AP Computer Science A 1/2 

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Algebra 1
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: 2-3 hours/week. There are 8 programming projects throughout the course, during which this may increase to 4-5 hours.

The Advanced Placement Program offers an introductory course and exam in computer science. The course emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and algorithm development and is meant to be the equivalent of a first-semester college-level course in computer science. It also includes the study of data structures, design, and abstraction. Students will be able to design and implement solutions to problems by writing, running, and debugging computer programs using the programming language Java. Students are expected to take the AP exam, but that exam is not part of the course grade.

Projects in Computer Science 1/2

  • .5 Credit /1 Semester – Grade 11,12
  • Prerequisite: Passing the AP CS exam or by permission from the instructor
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily As needed
This course will provide an opportunity for students to undertake a semester-long software development project under the supervision of the course instructor and local computing professionals (covering standard C-17 – Implement and manage software). The first half of this course will focus on software engineering and project management strategies (as outlined in standard C-12 – Demonstrate project management skills) and standard data structures and algorithms (C-16 – Develop programs). As students create their products, they will be responsible for writing documentation and verifying correctness (standard C-18 -Test and follow a Quality Assurance Process).

 

Intro to Medical Careers

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed

This is a semester long career and technical education course designed as an introductory course in the Health and Medical Pathway. In this course, students will be asked to apply their understanding of social and cultural conditions surrounding equity and access to the health care system in order to explore the promotion and protection of community health. The course focuses on the interrelationships of career exploration and foundation skills necessary for a career in the Healthcare field. Topics include History and Trends of Healthcare, Personal and Professional Qualities of a Healthcare Worker, Legal and Ethical Responsibilities, Emergency Care, Infection Control, Medical Math, Wellness and Nutrition, Client Status and Medical Terminology.

Physiology & Anatomy A/B

  • 1.0 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed
This class will provide students with an understanding of the structure and function of the human body. It is an introduction to anatomy and physiology, muscular and skeletal, nervous and endocrine systems. Students will be prepared to answer the following questions about each of the body systems: What are the parts of the system and what do they do? What is the relationship between the structure and function of the parts? How does this system work with other systems in the body? How does this system support the overall functioning of the body and homeostasis? How do illness and injury threaten or disrupt the system? In each unit, students will develop an understanding of the basic anatomy of the system and the role of the system in overall body function and homeostasis.

 

Health

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9 (Requirement), Grades 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed

This class is required for graduation according to state graduation requirements. All students need to take Health for .5 credit. Health class integrates a variety of health concepts and decision-making behaviors to plan for personal and lifelong health goals. Students develop skills that make them health-literate adults. These include awareness and consequences of risky behaviors, disease prevention, overall wellness, and identification of community health resources. Students are taught how to access accurate information that they can use to promote health for themselves and others. Students demonstrate comprehensive health and wellness knowledge and skills. They use research, goal-setting, and communication skills to protect their health and that of the community.

Personal Fitness

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9 (Requirement), 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Exercise Attire
  • Homework: As needed

This required course will be the starting point for a student’s high school career in physical education. This course will include teaching what all students should know and be able to do in physical education.

Individual Activity (Spin and Yoga)

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Exercise Attire
  • Homework: As needed

This course provides students with skills and knowledge promoting lifetime fitness. This course will predominantly focus on Spin and yoga. Diverse fitness activities may also be covered such as: cardio walking/jogging, core work, Pilates, Zumba, step aerobics and other group fitness activities. This course is for improving personal fitness levels and health through multiple activities.

Team Sports

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Exercise Attire
  • Homework: As needed

This course presents the opportunity for each student to participate in a variety of team sports. Class emphasis is on developing both fundamental skills and complex skill combinations and strategies. This class builds a connection between skill-related fitness and the goal of improved performance. In addition, students evaluate ways in which physical activities can provide for positive social interaction and enjoyment. An ongoing focus is to understand and anticipate how physical activity promotes wellness throughout one’s life. Unit examples include soccer, softball, flag football, basketball, volleyball, ultimate frisbee, floor hockey, team handball, Gaelic football and fitness activities.

Strength & Conditioning

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Exercise Attire
  • Homework: As needed

This course gives students the opportunity to participate and apply principles of strength training through a variety of activities in and out of the weight room. Areas of focus mainly include muscle endurance and muscle strength but also involve work on power, speed, flexibility, cardio-respiratory endurance, speed and agility. Activities include core development, proper lifting techniques and a personalized lifting program.

Unified PE

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Exercise Attire
  • Homework: As needed

The purpose of this class is to bring all ability levels together in an inclusive learning environment, where the pace and content of the class is respectful to all types of learners. Opportunities for peer support and encouragement for collaboration in team building activities, individual sports, exercises, using adaptive materials, and rhythmic activities will be principles taught in this class through the structure of students learning through other students. An abundance of movement, scaffolding of skills, and positive peer support are constant and critical fitness skills are emphasized simultaneously in a team building activities. Additionally, there is an opportunity for both groups of students to learn about each other in a setting where a focus is placed on their strengths. This class will follow the physical education core curriculum and enhance teaching and learning skills for students.

 

Music – Choral

Concert Choir A&B

  • 1 credit or .5 credit / 1 Year or 1 semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $15
  • Materials Required: Uniform Purchase (financial support available)
  • Homework: Required performances; daily practice recommended

Students in this course participate in an intermediate to advanced choral performing ensemble that performs quality choral literature from a variety of genres and cultures. Students learn vocal technique and musicianship skills. Students perform in school concerts and regional festivals. This course may be repeated for credit. In the 2021-22 school year students have the option to take concert choir for one semester or a full year.

Chorale A&B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Audition
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $65
  • Materials Required: Uniform Purchase (financial support available)
  • Homework:  Required performances; daily practice recommended

This advanced year-long course is designed to prepare the serious choral student for choral music experiences beyond high school. Chorale is an advanced choral performing ensemble. Students perform quality choral literature from a variety of genres, cultures, and styles, and learn correct vocal technique and musicianship skills. This course is a continuation of the choir sequence. Students perform in school concerts and regional festivals. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit. This course is auditioned and open to students 9-11.


Music – Instrumental

Concert Band

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Previous experience on appropriate instrument
  • Suggested Lab Fee: A $65
  • Materials Required: Uniform Purchase
  • Homework: Required performances; daily practice recommended

This year-long performing ensemble is for students who play woodwind and brass instruments. Students develop skills in tone production, phrasing, rhythmic and aural acuity, and advances technical skills associated with one’s instrument along with correct posture. Band students learn and perform a wide variety of music from different cultures and time periods. Students perform in school concerts, regional festivals and athletic events. This course may be repeated for credit.

Wind Ensemble

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Director’s Permission. Must play one of the standard woodwind, brass, or percussion instruments.
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $65
  • Materials Required: Uniform purchase
    Homework: Required performances; daily practice recommended

This year-long performing ensemble is designed for advanced students who play woodwind and brass instruments. Students continue to develop skills in tone production, phrasing, rhythmic and aural acuity, advanced technical skills associated with one’s instrument and correct posture. Students learn and perform a wide variety of music from different cultures and time periods. Students perform in school concerts, regional festivals and athletic events. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course is auditioned.

Jazz Band

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Audition only. Must be in another major performing ensemble (Concert Band, Wind Ensemble, Percussion or Orchestra); exceptions are made for piano and guitar students. Auditions are held in the late Spring each year.
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $65 (does not include cost of ensemble field trips)
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Required performances; daily practice recommende

Students in this year-long performing ensemble learn about various jazz styles and concepts, including improvisation, jazz theory, and jazz history with traditional wind and rhythm section instrumentation. Students participate in all Jazz Band performances and activities during or outside the normal school day, including participation in festivals and trips. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit. This course is auditioned. This course meets before school every day. Students must also be enrolled in an ensemble class during the school day.

Percussion Ensemble

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Previous percussion experience
  • Suggested Lab Fee: Suggested Lab Fee: $65
  • Materials Required: Uniform purchase; Appropriate drumsticks and mallets
  • Homework: Required performances; daily practice recommended

This year-long ensemble is intended for students who are interested in playing pitched and non-pitched percussion instruments in a cohesive performing ensemble. Students learn and perform a wide variety of music from different cultures and time periods and perform in school concerts and regional festivals. This course may be repeated for credit. 

Concert Orchestra

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Previous experience on a string instrument
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $65
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Required performances; daily practice recommended

This year-long performing ensemble is for intermediate students who play violin, viola, cello, and bass. Orchestra students play a wide variety of music from different cultures and time periods and perform in school concerts and regional festivals. Students develop skills in tone production, phrasing, rhythmic and aural acuity, and the advancement of technical skills. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit.

Chamber Orchestra

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Teacher signature and audition in Spring.  Experience on a String instrument
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $65
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: 120 minutes weekly practice or private lessons

This year-long performing ensemble is for advanced students who play violin, viola, cello, and bass. Orchestra students play a wide variety of music from different cultures and time periods and perform in school concerts and regional festivals. Students develop advanced skills in tone production, phrasing, rhythmic and aural acuity, and the advancement of technical skills such as shifting, vibrato, bow control, and posture. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit.  This course is auditioned.

Symphony Orchestra

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Previous experience on a string, woodwind, or brass instrument. Audition or director approval
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $65
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Required performances; daily practice recommended

This year-long performing ensemble is for advanced students of String, Wind, Brass, and Percussion instruments. Orchestra students play a wide variety of music from different cultures and time periods and perform in school concerts and regional festivals. Students develop advanced skills in tone production, phrasing, rhythmic and aural acuity, and the advancement of technical skills. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit. This course is auditioned

Piano Lab

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $20
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As needed

Students in this course learn to play the piano. Students in the piano class will learn the necessary skills and concepts to gain a rudimentary proficiency on the piano keyboard. This is a one semester class. This course may be repeated for credit.

Guitar Lab

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $20
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As needed

Students in this course will learn the necessary skills and concepts to gain a rudimentary proficiency on guitar and music-reading. This is a one semester class. This course may be repeated for credit.


Theater

Theatre Beginning

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Pencils, highlighters, and a notebook/journal.
  • Homework: As needed

This introductory course is for all students looking to develop skills in acting and performing in front of others. Public speaking, creative problem solving, and collaboration are explored through creative activities, voice and movement exercises, improvisation, story structure, creating character, and scene study. All are welcome, no prior experience is required.

Theatre Intermediate

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Theatre Beginning
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Pencils, highlighters, and a notebook/journal
  • Homework: As needed

This intermediate course explores the art of creating character and commanding the attention of an audience during performance. The course includes analysis of contemporary and classic scripts, professional blocking and directing, and preparing monologues for auditions. Students will utilize self-direction to collaborate in small groups and an openness to critical feedback and reflection

Theatre Advanced

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Theatre 
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Materials Required: Pencils, highlighters, and a notebook/journal.
  • Homework: As needed

This advanced course expands exposure to contemporary and classic plays, broadens student repertoire of audition material, and explores specialized acting skills. The course may include topics such as advanced acting methods, resume development, movement-based acting techniques, pantomime, mask work, improvisation, stage combat, stage make-up, or creative drama.

Technical Theatre Beginning

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Materials Required: Pencils, highlighters, and a notebook/journal.
  • Homework: As Needed

This production-oriented course provides a foundation to stagecraft skills and safety procedures preparing students for industry and college study of technical theatre. Students receive an introduction to theatre terminology, scenic design and construction, lighting, sound, properties, costumes, make-up, special effects, theatre management and stage management. 

Technical Theater Advanced

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite:Tech Theatre Beginning
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Pencils, highlighters, and a notebook/journal.
  • Homework: As Needed

In this advanced level course students continue to develop their skills in the areas of Technical Theatre and Design. Students in this course are expected to understand, apply, analyze and assist in the creation of a unifying concept for a production in one or more of the following disciplines: lighting, sound, properties, set construction, special effects, costumes, make-up, theatre management or stage management. Students may choose a technical theatre focus, assist, and then lead the design process for a main stage production including development of a design portfolio. This course is offered as a CTE course which can be cross-credited for Fine Arts. This course is also offered as a Fine Arts credit only.

Outside of School Theater Opportunities:

Theatre Play Production (Auditions TBD)

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Audition
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As needed

This course prepares students to use the skills and techniques of acting and performance in one or more plays produced for a public audience. This course mirrors professional theater standards, culminating with a full-scale production of a play. Students enrolled in the course may also have opportunities to work in areas of theatre production including directing, scenic design and construction, costuming, properties, stage management, promotions and publicity. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts requirements. This will be an after-school commitment for credit. Auditions TBD.

Musical Theatre Production (Auditions TBD)

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Audition
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As needed

This course prepares students to synthesize the skills and techniques of acting, singing, dancing and performance into a musical theatre production for a public audience. Throughout this process students develop community by working as an ensemble. This course mirrors professional theater standards, culminating in a full-scale production of a musical. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts requirements.  This will be an after-school commitment for credit.  Auditions TBD.


Visual Art

Drawing and Painting Beginning

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $40
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As needed

Drawing and Painting Beginning introduces students to the Elements of Art and Principles of Design. Study of these are included in art projects to establish fluency in the language of art. Students create art in a variety of drawing and painting media and explore the relationship between observation, artistic vision, and composition. Students use sketchbooks or other means to develop skills and ideas. Visual Art builds lifelong skills through the critical thinking and creative process.  No previous art experience necessary. All students are welcome. This course may be repeated for credit.

Drawing and Painting Advanced

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Drawing/Painting Beginning
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $40
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As needed

Drawing and Painting Advanced is intended for students who want to further their knowledge and experience in drawing and painting media. Students in this course will continue to create art and explore the relationship between observation, artistic vision, and composition in an advanced setting. Students will explore media and ideas with more independence and demonstrate responding and reflecting on their own work and that of others. Students will produce a portfolio of work at the end of this course.
Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit. 

Ceramics Beginning

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $40
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As needed

This beginning course is for students who want to work with their hands and develop ideas in 3-dimensional form. Students work with clay, creating both functional and non-functional art pieces. Students learn the properties of clay, construction methods, glazing techniques and the firing process as core concepts of this course. Students learn about ceramic arts and artists from a variety of contemporary and historical sources and across cultures. No previous art experience necessary. All students are welcome. This course may be repeated for credit. 

Ceramics Advanced

  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Ceramics Beginning
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $40
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As needed

Students in this course explore Ceramics at a higher level with hand building and wheel methods. Students design and develop works through investigation of techniques and materials through ceramic arts and artists from a variety of contemporary and historical sources and across cultures. Assignments will be more complex, challenging students to make deeper connections and use voice to communicate ideas. Students have a portfolio of work at the end of the semester. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit

AP Art and Design A&B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting ability
  • Suggested Lab Fee: $40 per semester (materials and supplies)
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: 6+ Hours /Week

The AP Art and Design course presents an inquiry-based approach to learning about art and design. Students are expected to conduct in-depth and sustained investigation of materials, processes and ideas with a media focus, (Drawing, 2D and 3D art), to help students become inquisitive, thoughtful artists and designers. This course continues for a second semester where students continue to develop their portfolio work in preparation for AP College Board submission. Students further develop their personal voice in the visual arts as they work in their chosen media or focus. Student work is developed for a portfolio that will be submitted to the AP College Board for review and scoring. This course is recommended but not limited to students looking to apply to art colleges after high school. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements.

French

French 1 A&B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: Weekly,1-2 hours

This Course allows students to develop basic proficiency in the four skills of communication: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Content includes vocabulary common to daily needs knowledge and use of formal and informal register, basic grammatical structures, comprehension of familiar topics, development of, sensitivity to, and an acceptance of cultural differences. Students are expected to actively participate in class, memorize vocabulary, and practice grammar outside of class.

French 2 A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of French 1
  • Homework: Weekly, 1-2 hours

This class allows further development and reinforcement of basic proficiency in the four skills of communication mentioned in Level 1 as they relate to expansion of vocabulary, grammatical structures, guided composition and conversation, and culture studies in the language. Two years toward the two-year college/university admission requirement met upon successful course completion.

French 3 A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of French 2
  • Homework: Weekly, 1-2.5 hours

Level 3 is an extension and expansion of Level 2 with additional emphasis on conversation and writing. More advanced terms and grammar are introduced, practiced and reinforced. Students work toward total immersion in the target language.

French 4 A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of French 3 with C or better or teacher recommendation
  • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
  • Materials Required: Workbook
  • Homework: Weekly, 2-3 hours

Advanced foreign language classes give students an opportunity to experience and discuss literature, history, art, and current events. This course will be taught entirely in the target language. Students refine communication skills by using authentic cultural material, films, videos, magazines, and newspapers. Students work toward total immersion in the selected language.

AP French Language & Culture 5 A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of French 4 with B- or better or teacher recommendation
  • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
  • Materials Required: Workbook
  • Homework: Weekly, 2-3 hours

The rigor of this course is the equivalent of a third-year college course in advanced composition and conversation. It includes aural/oral skills, reading comprehension of varied materials, grammar and composition. Communication objectives are comprehension of formal and informal language, acquisition of vocabulary, composition of expository passages and ability to express ideas and opinions orally and in writing with accuracy. Students are expected to take the AP exam, but that exam is not part of the course grade. 


Japanese

Japanese 1 A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
  • Materials Required: Workbook
  • Homework: Weekly, 1-2 hours

This Course allows students to develop basic proficiency in the four skills of communication: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Content includes vocabulary common to daily needs, knowledge and use of formal and informal register, basic grammatical structures, comprehension of familiar topics, development of, sensitivity to, and an acceptance of cultural differences. Students are expected to actively participate in class, memorize vocabulary, and practice grammar outside of class.

Japanese 2 A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Japanese 1
  • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
  • Materials Required: Workbook
  • Homework: Weekly, 1-2 hours

This class allows further development and reinforcement of basic proficiency in the four skills of communication mentioned in Level 1 as they relate to expansion of vocabulary, grammatical structures, guided composition and conversation, and culture studies in the language. Two years toward the two-year college/university admission requirement met upon successful course completion.

Japanese 3 A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Japanese 2 with C or better or teacher recommendation
  • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
  • Materials Required: Workbook
  • Homework: Weekly, 1-2 hours

Level 3 is an extension and expansion of Level 2 with additional emphasis on conversation and writing. Grammar is reviewed, practiced and reinforced. Students work toward total immersion in the target language.

Japanese 4 A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Japanese 3 with C or better or teacher recommendation
  • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
  • Materials Required: Workbook
  • Homework: Weekly, 2-3 hours

Advanced foreign language classes give students an opportunity to experience and discuss literature, history, art, and current events. This course will be taught entirely in the target language. Students refine communication skills by using authentic cultural material, films, videos, magazines, and newspapers. Students work toward total immersion in the selected language.

AP Japanese Language & Culture 5 A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Japanese 4 with B- or better or teacher recommendation
  • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
  • Materials Required: Workbook
  • Homework: Weekly, 2-3 hours

The rigor of this course is the equivalent of a college course in advanced composition and conversation. It includes aural/oral skills, reading comprehension of varied materials, grammar and composition. Communication objectives are comprehension of formal and informal language, acquisition of vocabulary, composition of expository passages and ability to express ideas and opinions orally and in writing with accuracy. Students are expected to take the AP exam, but that exam is not part of the course grade.

Japanese Independent Study – Career Applications of Language in Japanese

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of AP Spanish with B- or better or teacher recommendation
  • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
  • Materials Required: Workbook
  • Homework: Weekly, 3-5 hours

This course is intended for students who successfully complete AP courses and want to continue studying the language at the advanced level. Main course topics will revolve around career applications of language and how to use chosen language as a career or to advance future careers. Students will also deepen their understanding of the chosen language and culture by exploring advanced readings and participating in extended discussions on advanced topics of interest. They will engage in research to explore selected career topics in depth.


Spanish

Spanish 1 A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
  • Homework: Weekly, 1-2 hours 

This Course allows students to develop basic proficiency in the four skills of communication: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Content includes vocabulary common to daily needs, knowledge and use of formal and informal register, basic grammatical structures, comprehension of familiar topics, development of, sensitivity to, and an acceptance of cultural differences. Students are expected to actively participate in class, memorize vocabulary, and practice grammar outside of class.

Spanish 2 A/B

  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Spanish 1
  • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
  • Homework: Weekly, 1-2 hours
  • This class allows further development and reinforcement of basic proficiency in the four skills of communication mentioned in Level 1 as they relate to expansion of vocabulary, grammatical structures, guided composition and conversation, and culture studies in the language. Two years toward the two-year college/university admission requirement met upon successful course completion.

    Spanish 3 A/B

    • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
    • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Spanish 2
    • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
    • Homework: Weekly, 1-2 hours

    Level 3 is an extension and expansion of Level 2 with additional emphasis on conversation and writing. Grammar is reviewed, practiced and reinforced. Students work toward total immersion in the target language.

    Spanish 4 A&B>

    • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
    • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Spanish 3
    • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
    • Homework: Weekly, 2-3 hours

    This class give students an opportunity to experience and discuss literature, history, art, and current in the target language. Students refine communication skills by using authentic cultural material, films, videos, magazines, and newspapers.

    AP Spanish Language & Culture 5 A/B 

    • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
    • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Spanish 4 with B- or better or teacher recommendation
    • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
    • Materials Required: AP Spanish Barron practice book 
    • Homework: Weekly, 2-3 hours 

    The rigor of this course is the equivalent of a college course in advanced composition and conversation. It includes aural/oral skills, reading comprehension of varied materials, grammar and composition. Communication objectives are comprehension of formal and informal language, acquisition of vocabulary, composition of expository passages and ability to express ideas and opinions orally and in writing with accuracy. Students are expected to take the AP exam, but that exam is not part of the course grade.

    AP Spanish Literature 6 A/B

    • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 11, 12
    • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of AP Spanish Language & Culture
    • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
    • Materials Required: AP Spanish Barron practice book 
    • Homework: Weekly, 2-3 hours 

    The basic program exposes students to a wide variety of genres and types of discourse and will enable student to trace the history of Spanish prose from Don Juan Manuel to modern times through some of its most brilliant practitioners including Pablo Neruda, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Isabel Allende. Through a structured progression of topics students will gain the knowledge and skills that will enable them to think critically and logically while speaking and writing in Spanish. Students are expected to take the AP exam, but that exam is not part of the course grade.

    Spanish Independent Study – Career Applications of Language in Spanish

    • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 11, 12
    • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of AP Spanish Literature with B- or better or teacher recommendation
    • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
    •  Homework: Weekly, 2-3 hours

    This course is intended for students who successfully completed both AP courses and want to continue studying the language at the advanced level. Main course topics will revolve around career applications of language and how to use chosen language as a career or to advance future careers. Students will also deepen their understanding of the chosen language and culture by exploring advanced readings and participating in extended discussions on advanced topics of interest. They will engage in research to explore selected career topics in depth. 


    ELD Adjunct

    • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
    • Meets Elective graduation requirement
    • Prerequisite: None
    • Suggested Lab Fee: None
    • Materials Required: None
    • Homework: As needed

    This mixed-grade course is designed to support English Language Learners, who are in mainstream core courses. It is a small, personalized class in which the primary aims are goal setting, prioritization and reflection, all with a view to building stronger learning strategies and habits. Students will have some portion of each week to work on mainstream coursework. In addition to the goal setting and prioritization, day to day activities will range from basic reading and writing skills (such as close reading skills, and narrative and expository writing) to Social Studies skills (such as map skills and current events) to more general skills (such as interviewing techniques, speech and presentation, vocabulary development).

    Focus

    • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
    • Meets Elective graduation requirement
    • Prerequisite: None
    • Suggested Lab Fee: None
    • Materials Required: None
    • Homework: As needed

    The fundamental objective of this course is to improve every student’s achievement in all other classes. Practice in this course will seek to arm students with strategies and skills to be successful in the general education curriculum. Needed skills will be taught using differentiated workshops, large group, small group and individualized instruction. Supplementary instruction may be provided by various computer-assisted instructional packagesAdditionally, this course provides resources and extended learning to students with Individualized Education Plans (IEPs). Students will receive Specially Designed Instruction (SDI) outlined in their IEPs in reading, math, written expression, behavior, communication and executive functioning skills. Students will be expected to stay fully engaged in SDI lessons, working on current classroom assignments, make-up work, reading, academic planning, and improving study and organizational skills.

    Introduction to Leadership

    • .5 Credit / 1 semester 
    • Prerequisite: None
    • Suggested Lab Fee: None
    • Materials Required: None
    • Homework: Participation in Activities as Assigned

    This class is a leadership learning laboratory that supports and challenges students to develop a strong sense of identity, as well as learn the habits of citizenship, service, ethical leadership, and the ability to think and act on behalf of the common good. In addition, students will learn introductory project management skills, communication skills, and healthy relationship skills.

    Important Policies

    Scheduling:

    Lincoln High School students register for the following year’s classes in the spring. Both semesters’ courses are selected at this time. Students should choose courses carefully to meet graduation requirements and their High School and Beyond Plan. Schedule changes are limited and withdrawing from a course can result in a W or an E on the transcript.


    Grading System:

    Grading policy will be determined by Seattle Public Schools and is currently being discussed. This is the current district information:
    Grades of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+ and D indicate credit earned in a class. An E grade indicates course failure and results in no credit earned. If a student wishes to take a class for a Pass/No Pass grade, this must be requested by the fifth week of the semester and may be chosen for only one course per semester. Students who are withdrawn from a class after the fifth week of the semester will earn an “E” on their transcript for that course unless the withdrawal is due to a move to another school. Classes dropped after the 10th day of the semester but before the 5th week of the semester will result in a “W” on the student’s transcript. Incompletes are rarely given and must be completed within six school weeks of the end of the grading period or the Incomplete will become an E grade. All classes earn .50 semester credit per semester, with the exception of TA (teacher assistant) positions which earn .25 semester credit.


    Report Cards and Progress Reports:

    Semester report cards are issued twice a year and distributed to students and families. Semester grades are posted to the official transcript. Student progress can be viewed in The Source throughout the semester.


    Weighted Class Rank:

    Class rank is an indicator requested by some colleges and universities, scholarship programs, and some employers. A weighted class rank system is intended to recognize students who take more rigorous academic courses. These include courses designated as Honors (H), Advanced Placement (AP), College in the High School (CIHS) and Running Start (HRS). Honors courses earn a half weighting point; AP, CIHS, and HRS courses earn a full weighting point. The weighted ranking process does not affect the GPA. The highest attainable GPA is 4.0 (WAC 180-57-050).


    Lincoln High School Valedictorian/Salutatorian Policy

    Lincoln’s Valedictorian and Salutatorian Policy under development:  These policies will include, but will not be limited to: GPA, Rigor of Courses, Citizenship and a minimum percentage of courses being taken on campus. 


    High School Credit for Middle School Courses:

    These policies will include, but will not be limited to GPA, rigor of courses, citizenship and a minimum percentage of courses being taken on campus.


    Making Up a Required Course:

    If a student fails a required course, s/he generally must expect to take that course through an after school or summer school credit retrieval program if available, or through an accredited program outside of Lincoln High School. Please consult with your Counselor prior to enrolling in outside courses.


    Course Fees:

    Some of our courses have suggested fees. Please see your Counselor if you have a financial hardship.


    NCAA Athletic Eligibility:

    Students interested in participating in college athletics after high school need to be aware that additional academic courses are required for eligibility and not all courses are approved for NCAA eligibility. Student athletes must also register with the NCAA Eligibility Center, preferably during the junior year. Visit the NCAA website  www.eligibilitycenter.org and see the Athletic Director or your Counselor for more information.


    College Credit Options

    Advanced Placement (AP) courses:Students in AP courses may earn college credit and/or advanced placement in college if they perform well on AP exams given in May and if their college of choice accepts the AP exam for credit. College credit is not guaranteed but rather is determined by each individual college upon the student?s enrollment in that college. AP courses at Lincoln High School prepare students for these exams and offer a rigorous subject study available. Please note: AP offerings may vary from year to year depending on student interest and staffing. Prerequisites for AP courses are outlined in the course descriptions in this catalog. There is a fee for students taking the AP exams. Students should see the Lincoln High School Testing Coordinator if they need fee assistance.

    College in the High School – College and University partnership courses:

    The College in the High School (CIHS) program allows Lincoln High School students the opportunity to earn College/University credit for courses taken at Lincoln High School. Lincoln High School teachers use college curriculum, activities, texts, tests, and grading scales. For a reduced tuition fee, students who meet the grading criteria may purchase college credit. 

    **Please note: As of this publication date, the Washington state legislature has determined that only 10th-12th grade students may purchase CIHS credit. This rule might change in the future to allow younger students to purchase credit, but this is currently not the case.

    Ninth grade students may be qualified to take CIHS courses, but they must be aware that, unless the rule is changed, they will not be allowed to purchase credit for these courses. For more information, see individual course descriptions in this catalog.


    Running Start:

    This program for 11th and 12th graders allows students to take classes at the community college and earn high school and college credit simultaneously. Tuition is free for a maximum of 15 credits per quarter in college-level courses numbered 100 or higher. However, the number of college credits each student may take free of tuition costs is limited by the number of classes the student is concurrently taking at the high school. Students are responsible for tuition for pre-college courses (numbering below 100) and any credits that exceed their allowable limit. Students are responsible for the cost of books and transportation. Priority application deadline for fall term is May 1. For winter and spring term deadlines, please see the Counseling Center as these deadlines vary between colleges. Students who are interested in the Running Start program should visit the community college websites and make an appointment with their Lincoln High School counselor for more information. Please see the Counseling Center tab on the Lincoln High School website for steps to getting started in Running Start.


    Off Campus SPS Vocational Programs

    Seattle Public Schools Skills Center SPS Skills Center is a secondary public education option that delivers advanced, free Career and Technical Education to high school students who are at least 16 years old.

    Students attend classes every day off-site as part of their regular school day. Ultimately, completion of Skills Center programs will earn industry certifications. If the Skills Center program is not located at the student?s home school, the student will travel to the school where the program is offered.

    Check out the Skills Center website for more information and to apply. Students should consult their counselor to see if the Skills Center is a good fit for them.